11 comments on ““Rollin’ and Tumblin’”: The Story of a Song

  1. Jonny Kinnaman on said:

    Jas– Nice. Another notable version would be Robert Johnson’s Traveling Riverside Blues. Paul Geremia did a great take on that which can be heard on his Live from Uncle Sam’s Backyard CD (btw, memo to Acoustic Guitar Magazine– do a cover story on Paul. Next month). And speaking of John Lee Hooker, that riff and the “whistle-bell” line also turned up on the Hooker and (Canned) Heat LP as “Peavine.” Again, nice piece.

  2. Jim Hatlo on said:

    Fascinating and entertaining scholarship, Jas. The Eddie “One-String” Jones episode was a gem by itself. Somewhere, Mike Seeger is smiling.

  3. Excellent article and excellent blog Jas, very much enjoyed both this and many others here. A true treasure trove of info long lost. Thanks!

  4. That was a great article, thanks. Now I have to find the tab that I know I have somewhere, and finally learn to play this great song!

  5. Great article, but I don’t see why Ry Cooder saw fit to call Leonard Chess and asshole. Chess was very much responsible for the excellent records that came out on his label during the early years. If you listen to “Little VIllage” he laughs off Sonny Boy’s cursing and encourages him through the track.

  6. oh-mercy on said:

    Thanks for this- What a wonderful historical look at this great tune.
    You’ve inspired me to actually spend more time with these roots. Something I’ve been interested in but never really did anything about aside from the occasional listen to the tunes that Dylan played on his radio station. He got me interested now its time to go deeper.
    Thanks again.

  7. ESTE EXCELENTE TEMA TAMBIEN FUE INTERPRETADO POR LA BANDA JAPONESA THE BLUES CREATION…UNA VERSIÓN ALUCINANTE QUE VALE LA PENA ESCUCHAR

  8. rick on said:

    Dylan’s speeded up version of Rollin’ and Tumblin’ sounds a bit like Elvis Presley’s “Tiger Man” from the 1968 special.

  9. Rebecca Davis on said:

    Thanks for remembering Canned Heat’s version of this classic song!

  10. Roberto el Verde on said:

    Gracias por el estupendo blog, este artículo me ha descubierto algunos músicos que no conocía. Os dejo un link con otra versión en español de la canción, una curiosidad. ¡Saludos!
    http://www.megaupload.com/?d=YXJ7G607

  11. Cameron Smith on said:

    Nice job on the article, Jas

    One thing I would add is that you didn’t make mention of Walter Rhodes’ 1927 recording “The Crowing Rooster” which was, to my knowledge, the first recorded piece to use this melody: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5xL8hLFY58

    Cheers!

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